Interesting Links

Sometimes during research you find websites that are just delightful, full of information you can use, or that tickle the fancy or the taste buds - but have no direct relevance to your own site.

It seems that for those of you who are regulars, you might share similar interests, so I have started this new page to add some of those links. There is no commercial advantage for listing them but I think you will enjoy their content.

This will be an ever-growing list so I hope you return regularly and wander off on the web to satisfy your curiosity, your humour and your taste buds – but please come back or we would miss you!

Here is a site full of lovely stories and recipes that bring the passion of food and place together:

Liliana Marquesini comes by her love of good food honestly, with parents on both sides of her family having Italian heritage.

Travel with her and test the recipes…mmmmm

Been there eaten that food

Abigail King left her medical career to follow her love of travel, gift for writing and photography.

Visit her at The Travel Lab.

Her invitation reads:

Join me as I explore the art and science of unusual journeys…

The Travel Lab

Boots ‘n All Travel is a fantastic guide to budget travelling: well written and with evocative photos.

Boots 'n All Travel

Chris Kissak translated his love of wine and desire to understand it into a truly marvelous website which has been his passion as it has evolved since 2000.

Chris specializes in the wines of Bordeaux and the Loire and his site is fascinating in its ability to not just give excellent wine notes – but to reveal the character of the appellations, estates and their history.

Well written and full of information, the site will have you off down to your best wine store and booking a trip to France.

Click on Producer Profile - then on that opening page click on one of the regions and then click on one of the Chateaux. There you have a descriptive history and a guide to its wines – and you will be an addicted fan thereafter!

The Wine Doctor

It takes me a minimum of four long days to complete a page for this site. This is because of the way I travel. As I mention elsewhere, I like the adventure to unfold spontaneously and to wander and be captivated by what I find. Naturally I take lots of photos. I then come home to do my research.

Most travel writers I know work in the reverse order. Sometimes I miss “the big thing” but I seldom feel cheated for what I have found gives me a deeper insight into the reality and uniqueness of the place.

In the course of my later research I am often seeking the right example from history to illustrate a point – and it was in this way that I cam to this fantastic page on General George S. Patton.

As most people know only what Hollywood has depicted of the great man, I thought my readers would also enjoy getting to know the real person and his passionate accumulation and use of knowledge.

Life of General Patton

Mark Smith is “the man in Seat 61” and his website of the same name is the best guide to train travel you will be able to find. He even knows which sites in Europe quote which fares for the same journey and how to get around it.

As he says himself, his love of train travel led him as a young man to run away to join the circus (which was called British Rail at the time) and his career with the railways just fueled his love of life on the rails (so to speak).

Even if you never do take the train, you will enjoy reading this site. It is filled with Mark’s love of train travel and the excitement of the journey itself.

Informative, based on a deep professional knowledge of railways and how they work, well-written and entertaining, this site will lure you back to take a trip with the man in seat 61.

The man in Seat 61

Sometimes you come across a website that just speaks the person into existence and you want to head off with several boxes of Triscuits (read the site and you will understand) to meet the author – oh – and to stay at her B&K (again, read the site – and smile as this is translated).

Casita de las Flores awaits you in the now ‘discovered’ but still lovely San Miguel de Allende, Mexico and it sounds to me tailored to suit the readers of discover-interesting-places !

Casita de las Flores

Mozart and Hayden wrote for the horn – and what a legacy is that!

However, I know the number of readers who play a French Horn – or even aspire to do so, is probably quite small – even minute – but well, this site is just so delightfully specialist it is worth a read and a listen.

For that small specialist group of French Horn aspirants, apart from the other services this “Horns a’ Plenty” site offers – like their “Wiltshiring” reconditioning service to dented and otherwise damaged horns - on this page there are great tracks of orchestras waiting for your solo performance.

For the rest of us, these are some of the sweetest classic tracks to add to your collection.

Horns a' Plenty

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